My Blog

Posts for category: Foot Condition

By Dr. Keith Rosenthal
January 03, 2019
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Crush   Crush Injury  

What is a Crush Injury?

Have a foot crush injury? A crush injury occurs when pressure or force is put on a body part. A foot crush injury may cause pain, swelling, and sometimes bruising. A foot crush injury may take from a few days to a few weeks to heal. If you have a foot crush injury, you should see a podiatrist. Podiatrists diagnose and treat foot and ankle conditions and injuries. Read on to learn more about foot crush injuries.


Overview- A crush injury is an injury that occurs when a body part sustains intense pressure. Minor crush injuries can be caused by dropping a heavy object on a foot. However, major crush injuries, such as those sustained in vehicle accidents, can cause serious problems. Such an injury can cause a number of issues, including pain, swelling, bruising, bleeding, laceration, fracture, and nerve injury. A crush injury can also cause compartment syndrome, which is a dangerous condition caused by pressure buildup from swelling of tissues or internal bleeding.


Causes- The primary causes of foot crush injuries include heavy falling objects, vehicles rolling over the foot, and injuries from industrial manufacturing equipment. Crush injuries are common on farms. The most serious cases occur in agriculture where heavy machinery is used and people become trapped in them or under them. This form of injury is common after some form of trauma from a deliberate attack or following a natural disaster.


Diagnosis- A proper diagnosis is key to treating a foot crush injury. Your podiatrist can accurately assess your situation and help you make the right treatment decisions for the best possible outcome. Your doctor will start with a physical exam, with attention given to the areas of complaint. Your podiatrist may take X-rays and other forms of imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computerized tomography (CT).


Treatment- Firstly, any wounds that are present will need to be cleaned and bandaged to prevent infection. Treatments for a foot crush injury may also include medication, casting, kinesiology taping, ice and heat, physical therapy, or surgery. Often more than one of these treatments are used. Crush injuries of the foot are very serious. Potentially devastating complications can occur if these injuries are underestimated or mismanaged.


A foot crush injury can affect your day-to-day activities and make your life miserable. Whether your goal is getting back to the work, the gym, hobbies, or just enjoying life, a podiatrist can help. If you want to feel better and live well, find a podiatrist near you and schedule an appointment.

By Dr. Keith Rosenthal
July 11, 2017
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Athlete's Foot  

Are you wondering if the foot problems you are experiencing could be a fungal infection?

If you are someone who doesn’t sport those shower shoes at your gym locker room, you may just find yourself dealing with a nasty case of athlete’s foot. Athlete’s foot is an itchy, unpleasant fungal infection that requires treatment to prevent it from spreading. Find out the common symptoms associated with athlete’s foot and how our Jackson and Brick, NJ, podiatrists, Dr. Keith Rosenthal and Dr. Sina Safar, can help.

When a fungal infection gets into the skin of the feet you’ll certainly know it. It’s actually pretty easy to catch a fungal infection since fungus is truly all around us. It loves to live in damp, warm areas like your local gym locker room, communal shower or swimming pool. If you have athlete’s foot then you may also be dealing with:

  • Itching, burning and/or redness between your toes or on the soles
  • Itching blisters on the feet
  • Dry or cracked skin between the toes
  • Discolored toenails

If you’ve never had athlete’s foot before then you may not know what to look for. Also, there are other conditions that could be causing your symptoms so, when in doubt, give our Jackson and Brick foot doctors a call. While athlete’s foot isn’t serious for the healthy individual and is treatable, it isn’t always that easy to treat.

Of course, if you are dealing with severe symptoms or if you don’t notice an improvement in your symptoms after at home care then it’s time to give us a call as soon as possible. We can prescribe a stronger antifungal medication (either topical or oral) that will be more effective at killing the fungus and giving you back those healthy feet once again.

If you ever have questions or concerns about the health of your feet, never hesitate to turn to the experts at Foot and Ankle Center with locations in Jackson and Brick, New Jersey. We are here to treat everything from minor problems like athlete’s foot to more serious issues like diabetic-related complications. Call us today! For the Jackson office, call 732 833 2800. For the Brick office, call 732 477 0441.

By Dr. Keith Rosenthal
March 02, 2017
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Shin Splints  

Although a shin splint is commonly used to describe various pains between the ankle and the knee, it actually refers to a specific inflammatory condition of the tibia -- a condition called medial tibial stress syndrome.

A type of "overuse injury" to the legs, the most common causes of shin splints include excessive running, poor conditioning and over-pronation (flattening of the arch). The result is pain in the front or inside of the lower leg that usually gets worse with a sudden increase in distance or intensity of training. Shin splints are a common problem for many runners and athletes. Muscle weakness, non-supportive shoes and overtraining are also contributing factors.

To prevent shin splints, warm up and stretch muscles before starting any workout activity and choose supportive footwear. Begin workouts gradually and avoid over-training. All of these methods will go a long way in helping to prevent many lower leg problems. Conservative treatment for most shin splint pain includes rest, ice, compression and elevation. Strengthening exercises, anti-inflammatory agents and custom foot orthotics may also be recommended to reduce symptoms.

Shin pain isn't always indicative of a shin splint. Lower leg pain may actually signal a more serious problem, including a stress fracture, partial muscle tear and tendonitis, all of which require special treatment. Always seek the professional care of a podiatrist if:

  • You have severe pain in your shin following an injury.
  • Your shin is hot and inflamed.
  • Swelling in your shin increases.
  • Shin pain persists during rest.

Proper diagnosis of the cause of pain is necessary in order to administer the most appropriate treatment. If you suffer from shin pain, visit your podiatrist for an evaluation and proper treatment.